The EPA recommends that all houses, regardless of what radon zone the house is located in, be tested for radon during point of sale. 

 

Radon is a radioactive gas that is tasteless, colorless, and odorless. 

 

The EPA has classified this gas as a carcinogen and records over 20,000 lung cancer deaths a year caused by elevated levels of radon.  Radon is the second leading cause to lung cancer next to smoking cigarettes. 

 

https://www.epa.gov/radon  

If your home was built before 1978, there is a good chance it has lead-based paint. In 1978, the federal government banned consumer uses of lead-containing paint, but some states banned it even earlier. Lead from paint, including lead-contaminated dust, is one of the most common causes of lead poisoning.

No safe level of lead exposure in children has been identified.

Exposure to lead can seriously harm a child’s health and cause well-documented adverse effects such as:

  • Damage to the brain and nervous system

  • Slowed growth and development

  • Learning and behavior problems

  • Hearing and speech problems

This can cause:

  • Lower IQ

  • Decreased ability to pay attention

  • Underperformance in school

There is also evidence that childhood exposure to lead can cause long-term harm.

The good news is that childhood lead poisoning is 100% preventable. For More Information https://www.epa.gov/lead/real-estate-disclosures-about-potential-lead-hazards#homebuyers

Infrared (thermal imaging) is an advanced, non-invasive technology that allows the inspector to show clients things about their homes or buildings that can’t be revealed using conventional inspection methods. For something as specialized as a thermal imaging inspection, it’s critical that the information presented meets the clients’ needs for information they can use and act on. The art of an IR inspection is to interpret the results as accurately and reasonably as possible such that the client is given actionable information in order to proceed with necessary repairs.

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma and other respiratory complaints.

  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.

  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.

  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.

  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by:

    • Venting bathrooms, dryers and other moisture-generating sources to the outside

    • Using air conditioners and de-humidifiers

    • Increasing ventilation

    • Using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing and cleaning

  6. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.

  7. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent, and dry completely. Absorbent materials such as ceiling tiles, that are moldy, may need to be replaced.

  8. Prevent condensation: Reduce the potential for condensation on cold surfaces (i.e., windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors) by adding insulation.

  9. In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (i.e., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks, or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).

  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere; they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods.   https://www.epa.gov/mold